Carolyn Piro, MSW, LCSW

Carolynn Aristone, Founder of Center for Intimate Relationships recently interviewed Carolyn Piro, MSW, LCSW, one of the therapists at CIR. In this interview, Carolynn and Carolyn discuss the different types of therapy that Ms. Piro uses to help her clients.

Learn more about the following approaches:

  • EMDR Therapy
  • Sand Tray Therapy
  • Imago Therapy
  • Polyvagal Therapy
  • Trauma Therapy
  • Individual Counseling
  • Couples Therapy
  • Sex Therapy

You can watch the video above or read through the transcript to learn more.

Carolynn Aristone, MSW, LCSW, CST:

Hi, Carolyn.

Carolyn Piro, MSW, LCSW:

Hey, Carolynn.

Carolynn Aristone, MSW, LCSW, CST:

I’m so excited because we get to talk about your work at Center for Intimate Relationships and your career as a therapist.

Carolyn Piro, MSW, LCSW:

Yes, thank you. I’m excited too. I appreciate this opportunity to be able to talk about my approach and how I might be able to help individuals and couples.

Carolynn Aristone, MSW, LCSW, CST:

Yes, I think that your approaches are really interesting and I know that many people may not know the approaches you use by their names.

I feel like having this conversation will be helpful for anyone that’s interested in working with you. They can better understand the way that you work with them.

I have a list of questions that I would like to ask you. So we’ll just take each one, one at a time and that’ll serve as a nice guide for our conversation. The first question is a little bit more general:

How long have you been working in the field of therapy?

Carolyn Piro, MSW, LCSW:

I’ve been officially in the field of therapy for 15 years. I got it into it through family first having to learn how to help my children manage anxiety and social skills challenges.

My initial therapy experiences were with my own children. And then I went through grad school internships with inpatient mental health services.

Carolynn Aristone, MSW, LCSW, CST:

Where did you go to graduate school?

Carolyn Piro, MSW, LCSW:

Rutgers. In Camden.

Carolynn Aristone, MSW, LCSW, CST:

So, your professional interest in therapy started out from a little bit of a place of a personal experience and advocating for your family and then learning more about the industry, and that sort of led you into a full-blown career as a therapist.

Carolyn Piro, MSW, LCSW:

Yes. I fell in love with helping people. My first internship was at an adult inpatient facility, and then my second internship was at a child and adolescent inpatient facility. It was a struggle because I loved both populations. It really was just fascinating and it gave me a sense of connection with people.

Carolynn Aristone, MSW, LCSW, CST:

And I imagine, too, that it is probably interesting to look back and think about the evolution of your career and where you are now.

We’re always growing and learning as therapists. I know that you currently work in New Jersey, but you also have some experience working abroad. Can you speak a little bit about your international experience as a psychotherapist?

Carolyn Piro, MSW, LCSW:

Yes. I worked with a company that contracted therapists to be on military bases, and I was assigned a base in southeast England at an Air Force base. I worked in their child and adolescent program.

I worked with the afterschool program and I worked with the birth to five-year-old program and there were about 300 kids in this program. For a time, I was the only therapist and we did a lot of family therapy.

It started out virtual because of the pandemic. And then it was nice because I got to move there and people got to meet me in person and it was an excellent experience. It’s interesting to look at military families because they are their own culture. They’re not American and they’re not British, they’re military. So they have their own set of challenges. I learned a lot about family dynamics and the stressors that these children experience being military kids.

Carolynn Aristone, MSW, LCSW, CST:

Yes. There are really unique challenges there, and they are in some ways very extraordinary challenges that, as a therapist, you are helping to support them in.

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